Freitag, 9. Februar 2018

The Heart of Conrad / Colm Tóibín

The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World. Maya Jasanoff. Penguin, 375 pp., $30.00

Joseph Conrad’s heroes were often alone, and close to hostility and danger. Sometimes, when Conrad’s imagination was at its most fertile and his command of English at its most precise, the danger came darkly from within the self. At other times, however, it came from what could not be named. Conrad sought then to evoke rather than delineate, using something close to the language of prayer. While his imagination was content at times with the tiny, vivid, perfectly observed detail, it was also nourished by the need to suggest and symbolize. Like a poet, he often left the space in between strangely, alluringly vacant.

 

Bettmann/Getty Images Joseph Conrad arriving in New York on the SS Tuscania, 1923
His own vague terms—words like “ineffable,” “infinite,” “mysterious,” “unknowable”—were as close as he could come to a sense of our fate in the world or the essence of the universe, a sense that reached beyond the time he described and beyond his characters’ circumstances. This idea of “beyond” satisfied something in his imagination. He worked as though between the intricate systems of a ship and the vague horizon of a vast sea..... [mehr] http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2018/02/22/the-heart-of-conrad/

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